The student news site of Pinecrest Preparatory Charter Middle-High School

The Crocnicle

  • January 10Welcome to our new staff writers!

  • December 31Happy New Year, Crocs!

Fall Festivals Around the World

Angelina Cuador and Alyssa Vargas

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






     fall-festival-slider-1When people think about festivities in fall, Thanksgiving and Halloween immediately come to mind. These are not the only festivities that are celebrated in the fall season, however; there are many lesser known activities that take part during this remarkable season. These include Guy Fawkes Night, Dia De Los Muertos, the New York City Halloween Parade, and others. They all come from a beautiful history that render the season filled with tradition and celebration. Even though many do not know of these, each of these festivals has its own beauty.  

        Created during 1605, Guy Fawkes Night has been celebrated in Great Britain for centuries. Also known as Bonfire Night, it originated from the Gunpowder Plot in 1605, a failed assassination attempt by James I by a cadre of provincial English Catholics. As a celebration of James I, surviving people lit bonfires. At our own school, 7th grader Sean Perez, admits “I do not know much about Bonfire Night, though it sounds very interesting and I would like to learn more about it.”

        In a similar way, and more commonly known after the movie “The Book of Life” came out, Dia De Los Muertos is the way some parts of the world celebrate Fall. Dia De Los Muertos, or the Day of the Dead, is celebrated in Mexico, Texas, California, Latin America, Arizona, The Philippines, and Spain from October 31st – November 2nd, and is associated with Allhallowtide. Some traditions for this festival are building altars to remember the dead, making food offerings to the dead, and caring for the dead. The “Catrina” or female skeleton is also a very popular figure for Dio De Los Muertos. Even at our school, some students know it well; 6th grader Anais Alvarez, for example, explains, “I love The Day of the Dead; it’s my absolute favorite fall festival.”

        The New York City Village Halloween Parade is another Fall tradition. It began in 1974 with Ralph Lee focusing on nontraditional outlets for his work. Every year on Halloween, Manhattan’s Greenwich Village’s streets are filled with ornate masks and towering costumes displayed in America’s only nighttime parade, as part of its largest puppeteering event. Still, at our school, as student Sean Perez explains, “I have honestly never heard of it but it sounds like a lot of fun, and I would like to attend one day.” Clearly, fall celebrations go far beyond the most commonly celebrated ones.

Print Friendly

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Fall Festivals Around the World

    Arts & Entertainment

    Hispanic Heritage: Frida Kahlo

  • Fall Festivals Around the World

    News

    Where did Halloween come from?

  • Fall Festivals Around the World

    School News

    [Croc] in the Middle

  • Fall Festivals Around the World

    School News

    Middle-School Robotics Makes it to STATE FINALS

  • Fall Festivals Around the World

    News

    Rare Love for Reptiles, On and Off Campus

  • Fall Festivals Around the World

    News

    Winning Dances on TV, and at School

  • Fall Festivals Around the World

    News

    How else have we been lied to?

  • Fall Festivals Around the World

    News

    New FAFSA Change to Make College Aid Decision Earlier and Easier

  • Fall Festivals Around the World

    Ask Irwin

    To Play or Not to Play?

  • Fall Festivals Around the World

    Arts & Entertainment

    “Sunshine” on Suicide Awareness

The student news site of Pinecrest Preparatory Charter Middle-High School
Fall Festivals Around the World